Social Listening of Events Relating to Buddhist and Muslim Relationships between 2015 and 2019 : How does Online Hate Speech Emerge among Thai Internet Users

Authors

อ.ดร.ชนัญสรา อรนพ ณ อยุธยา, นายเอกรินทร์ ต่วนศิริ, นายชาญชัย ชัยสุโกศล

Published

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS 5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE Hate Speech in Asia: Challenges and Solutions

Abstract

This study examined online conversation that is indicated as hate speech about relationships
between Buddhists and Muslims in Southern border provinces and other areas of Thailand
among Thai social media users. This research focused on online social data concerning six
events relating to Buddhist and Muslim relationships from 2015 to July 2019. Text-based
online data from social media platforms such as Facebook, twitter, Pantip website, and 27 of
Thai language-based Buddhist and Muslim community pages were collected and analyzed by
social listening tools. The findings showed that most of the online hate speech on events
relating to Buddhist and Muslim relationships was in a low level of hate speech intensity,
which included creating stereotype (level 1) and blaming, condemning, and dehumanizing
others (level 2). Meanwhile, making a denial of living together, which indicates a medium
level of hate speech intensity (level 3), occurred less. In addition, after events relating to
physical violence such as monk killings in Narathiwat Province and Christchurch mosque
shootings, it was found that hate speech intensity on those social media platforms increased
to a high level (level 4) or dangerous speech, which could incite people to break laws and
annihilate other groups. The findings also pointed out that less interesting events usually had
intense hate speech because a small number of people could create only a few different
opinions; those opinions tend to be in the same direction and could lead to an echo chamber
effect. We conclude that an informative approach is likely a better way to prevent people
from passing on and sharing hatred to others than a law or legislative approach. Creating
cultural norms to show that hate speech is not acceptable and should not be ignored both in
the society and online; promoting digital literacy among online media users; and creating
more awareness of human values such as solidarity, tolerance towards differences, diversity,
and digital empathy might reduce online conversation inciting hatred to others.

Social Listening of Events Relating to Buddhist and Muslim Relationships between 2015 and 2019 : How does Online Hate Speech Emerge among Thai Internet Users?. the Faculty of Law, Thammasat University , the International Conference on Hate Speech in Asia (4-12).